Fredericksburg

Peter Jefferson's 1747 map of the Fairfax Grant noted the location of Fredericksburg (and Falmouth) below the Fall Line
Peter Jefferson's 1747 map of the Fairfax Grant noted the location of Fredericksburg (and Falmouth) below the Fall Line
Source: University of North Carolina, "Early Maps of the American South," A Map of the northern neck in Virginia (by Peter Jefferson, Robert Brooke, Benjamin Winslow, Thomas Lewis, 1747)

Fredericksburg in 1856, looking south across the Rappahannock River
Fredericksburg in 1856, looking south across the Rappahannock River
Source: Mysteries and Conundrums blog, Setting the Stage for War: A Pictorial Proto-Website from 1856 (Edward Sachse & Co.)

looking across the Rappahannock River to Fredericksburg in December, 1862
looking across the Rappahannock River to Fredericksburg in December, 1862
Source: Smithsonian Institution, Plate 30. Fredericksburg, Virginia (from Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the War, Vol. II)

the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad bridge across the Rappahannock River was an early casualty of the Civil War
the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad bridge across the Rappahannock River was an early casualty of the Civil War
Source: Illustrated London News, Positions of the Federal and the Confederate Pickets on the Rappahannock at Fredericksburg, Dec. 4, 1862 (January 10, 1863)

in December 1862, Federal troops crossed the Rappahannock River on pontoon bridges and marched through Fredericksburg, but were decisively defeated by Confederates entrenched on the hills west of the town
in December 1862, Federal troops crossed the Rappahannock River on pontoon bridges and marched through Fredericksburg, but were decisively defeated by Confederates entrenched on the hills west of the town
Source: Library of Congress, Plan of the Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., Decr. 13, 1862

one rare winter campaign during the Civil War was the Federal attempt to cross the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg in January, 1863
one rare winter campaign during the Civil War was the Federal attempt to cross the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg in January, 1863
Source: Illustrated London News, The Civil War in America: Unsuccessful Attempt of the Army of the Potomac to Cross the Rappahannock on the 20th of January Last (February 28, 1863)

in 1863, development in Fredericksburg did not extend to the Rappahannock Canal yet
in 1863, development in Fredericksburg did not extend to the Rappahannock Canal yet
Source: Library of Congress, Sketch of the battles of Chancellorsville, Salem Church, and Fredericksburg, May 2, 3, and 4, 1863

by 1931, the predecessor to Mary Washington University was located on Marye's Heights and the city had expanded substantially
by 1931, the predecessor to Mary Washington University was located on Marye's Heights and the city had expanded substantially
Source: Library of Congress, Topographic map of Fredericksburg and vicinity, Virginia (1931)

Fredericksburg developed on the southern bank of the Rappahannock River, while Augustine Washington owned Ferry Farm on the northern bank in Stafford County
Fredericksburg developed on the southern bank of the Rappahannock River, while Augustine Washington owned Ferry Farm on the northern bank in Stafford County
Source: Historical collections of Virginia, View of Fredericksburg from the Washington Farm (p.477)

the canal network in Fredericksburg started west of town on the Rappahannock River
the canal network in Fredericksburg started west of town on the Rappahannock River
Source: City of Fredericksburg Maps, 1891 Development Co. Property

waterpower at Fredericksburg fueled industrial development
waterpower at Fredericksburg fueled industrial development
Source: City of Fredericksburg Maps, 1850s WaterPower - Dam / Canals / Mills

restaurants along the Rappahannock River offer views of Chatham Manor in Stafford County
restaurants along the Rappahannock River offer views of Chatham Manor in Stafford County

Fredericksburg in February 1863
Fredericksburg in February 1863
Source: Alexander Gardner, Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the War

Fredericksburg in the Civil War was about five blocks wide
Fredericksburg in the Civil War was about five blocks wide
Source: Library of Congress, No. III - Map of the Battlefield of The Wilderness

The Orange and Alexandria Railroad siphoned the Piedmont trade to Alexandria before Fredericksburg's Rappahannock Canal could link the upper Rappahannock River valley to the port on the Fall Line.

Fredericksburg and Gordonsville Railroad

Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad

Fredericksburg Slave Block

The Transportation Network of Alexandria

City of Fredericksburg sets speed limits inside city boundaries, while Virginia Department of Transportation sets speed limits for surroundig counties - and I-95
"City of Fredericksburg sets speed limits inside city boundaries, while Virginia Department of Transportation sets speed limits for surroundig counties - and I-95
Source: Virginia Department of Transportation, Posted Speed Limits

Links

the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad Bridge over the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg was destroyed and rebuilt several times during the Civil War
the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad Bridge over the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg was destroyed and rebuilt several times during the Civil War
Source: Frank Leslie's Illustrated History of the Civil War, Rebuilding the Railroad Bridge Over the Rappahannock to Fredericksburg, Burnt By the Confederates in Their Retreat From Falmouth April 19th, 1862 (p.2034)

Confederates repulsed the December, 1862 Union assault at Fredericksburg because road and railroad bridges across the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg had been destroyed, and the Union pontoons were delayed
Confederates repulsed the December, 1862 Union assault at Fredericksburg because road and railroad bridges across the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg had been destroyed, and the Union pontoons were delayed
Source: Library of Congress, View of Fredericksburg, Va. Nov. 1862

Union forces attacking Fredericksburg in December, 1862 crossed the Rappahannock River on boats and then pontoon bridges
Union forces attacking Fredericksburg in December, 1862 crossed the Rappahannock River on boats and then pontoon bridges
Source: Frank Leslie's Illustrated History of the Civil War, Bombardment of Fredericksburg, Va., By the Army of the Potomac, Commanded By General Burnside, Thursday, December 11th, 1862 (p.296)

buildings in Fredericksburg were set on fire in December, 1862
buildings in Fredericksburg were set on fire in December, 1862
Source: Library of Congress, Battle of Fredericksburg--the Army o.t. Potomac crossing the Rappahannock in the morning of Dec. 13' 1862, under t. comd. of Gen's Burnside, Sumner, Hooker & Franklin

Fredericksburg in 1862
Fredericksburg in 1862
Source: Archive.org, Frank Leslie's illustrated history of the Civil War (p.154)

Fredericksburg and its canals, 1862
Fredericksburg and its canals, 1862
Source: Library of Congress, Fredericksburg (1862)

Fredericksburg in early 1863
Fredericksburg in early 1863
Source: Library of Congress, Views of Fredericksburg, Va., February 1863


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