Virginia Ecosystems

ecoregion boundaries are used in analysis of Land Use Land Cover (LULC) trends
ecoregion boundaries are used in analysis of Land Use Land Cover (LULC) trends
Source: US Geological Survey, Land Cover Trends Project

As defined by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, Virginia is part of the Eastern Temperate Forest. Unless the land is disturbed, the climate and soils allow a dense forest to form with 100' tall broadleaf deciduous trees and needle-leafed conifers.1

Virginia's ecoregions, as defined in the Commission for Environmental Cooperation's North American Terrestrial Ecoregions (2021)
Virginia's ecoregions, as defined in the Commission for Environmental Cooperation's North American Terrestrial Ecoregions (2021)
Source: ESRI, ArcGIS Online

In Bailey's definition of ecoregions, Virginia includes the Outer Coastal Plain Mixed Province, Southern Mixed Forest Province, and the Central Appalachian Broadleaf Forest-Coniferous Forest-Meadow Province.2

Virginia includes three provinces within the ecoregions defined by Robert Bailey in 1995
Virginia includes three provinces within the ecoregions defined by Robert Bailey in 1995
Source: US Forest Service, Description of the Ecoregions of the United States

Links

Virginia ecoregions, as classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (Omernik)
Virginia ecoregions, as classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (Omernik)
Source: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), EnviroAtlas

References

1. "Ecological Regions of North America," Commission for Environmental Cooperation, 1997, pp.24-25, http://www.cec.org/files/documents/publications/1701-ecological-regions-north-america-toward-common-perspective-en.pdf (last checked January 1, 2022)
2. Robert G. Bailey, "Description of the Ecoregions of the United States," US Forest Service, March 1995, https://www.fs.fed.us/land/ecosysmgmt/index.html (last checked January 1, 2022)


Habitats and Species
Virginia Places