Rassawek

John Smith recorded the existence of five Monacan towns, including the capital Rassawek
John Smith recorded the existence of five Monacan towns, including the capital Rassawek
Source: Library of Congress, Virginia (by John Smith, 1624)

John Smith recorded five towns of the Monacan confederacy, including its capital Rassawek. It was a palisaded town located at the mouth of what the English named the Rivanna River after their Queen Anne.

Colonists later named the site "Point of Fork." People travelling upstream by boat could veer right onto the Rivanna, or take the left fork. The left fork was originally named the Fluvanna River, but later the larger fork became simply part of the James River. It was named after King James I by the first English colonists who arrived in 1607.

Downstream, the Algonquian-speaking tribes under Paramount chief Powhatan had called it Powhatan's River before the colonists arrived. The Siouan-speaking Monacans in the Piedmont would not have used the name of their rival on the Coastal Plain. Whatever river names were used by the Monacans are not used on any modern maps.1

Much of the Monacan heritage has been lost; the culture of the colonial settlers has replaced place names and much, much more. Point of Fork was recognized as the historic site of a Revolutionary War skirmish where British forces destroyed a Continental Army supply depot in 1781, nrather than as the site of a major Monacan town.

In 2019, the remnants of Rassawek were threatened with destruction.

In 2009, Fluvanna and Louisa counties created the James River Water Authority (JRWA) and planned a water pipeline from the James River to Zion's Crossroads. Commercial development there was expected to increase tax revenue for the two counties substantially. Zion's Crossroads lacked sufficient water supplies, but was the most attractive location because the crossroads was at the intersection of US 15 and US 250/I-64.

The authority decided to build a water pump station at "Point of Fork" next to the former town of Columbia. It bought the property there in July 2016. Part of the process to obtain a US Army Corps of Engineers permit for the construction in the navigable James River is the Section 106 process, requiring assessment of the impacts on historic and cultural resources. The Monacans were contacted in May, 2017. The authority offered to conduct archeological studies before excavating the four-acre site for the pump station, to facilitate reburial if any graves were discovered, and to make a donation to the Monacan Ancestral Museum.2

the pump station at Point of Fork would provide water for development at Zion's Crossroads
the pump station at Point of Fork would provide water for development at Zion's Crossroads
Source: ESRI, ArcGIS Online

The US Army Corps of Engineers must issue a permit for the pump station. That required a consultation process under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, to consider how to mitigate the impacts on Rassawek. The tribe encouraged the Virginia Department of Historic Resources to consult with the three North Carolina tribes that also share Eastern Siouan background, because the Sappony Tribe, the Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation, and the Haliwa-Saponi Indian Tribe also had an ancestral affiliation with the site of Rassawek.

The Monacan Nation initially focused on negotiating how the impacts of constructing the new pump station could be mitigated. Once the tribe learned that the James River Water Authority had identified alternative locations for the project, it flatly opposed construction at the Point of Fork location because:3

It is the Monacan equivalent of Werowocomoco, the Powhatan capital now planned to be a national park.

The tribe noted that all Monacan towns had sent their tribute to Rassawek, and it once had a longhouse of sixty feet with at least a dozen roundhouses. Earliest occupation was over 5,000 years ago, "about 200 generations before John Smith", and the planned approach to archeological excavation was viewed as inadequate. The proposal to excavate burials and transfer artifacts to a museum did not ensure they would go to the Monacan Nation. The tribe estimated it would cost over $300,000 for reburial of skeletons and perpetual maintenance of a new site, and disturbance of graves was not desired:4

Tribes often have their ancestors' bones returned in cardboard boxes, having been handled unceremoniously by strangers. Careful treatment and rehabilitation of these remains is something that drains the Nation of emotional, financial, and mental resources and attention. The Nation has already had to endure several somber and traumatizing repatriation ceremonies in the past, and it does not wish to experience that again - especially when JRWA has the ability to avoid these issues by relocating the pump station.

The James River Water Authority had not anticipated the Monacan objections. It had already acquired right-of-way and built a water treatment plant at Ferncliff, in Louisa County between the Fluvanna County line and I-64. If the Corps of Engineers determined that the authority must use an alternative location for its James River pump station, then up to 10 miles of additional pipeline would have to be constructed.5

the pump station at Rassawek (R) was expected to pump water to a treatment plant at Ferncliff (X), which would send drinking water to Zion's Crossroads
the pump station at Rassawek (R) was expected to pump water to a treatment plant at Ferncliff (X), which would send drinking water to Zion's Crossroads
Source: ESRI, ArcGIS Online

In September 2019, the James River Water Authority (JRWA) was notified that must submit a new application for the project. The Corps determined that the project should not be approved under the Nationwide Permit 12 application that had ben submitted; instead, a more-detailed individual (standard) permit was required to obtain more comprehensive public interest review. More significantly, the Virginia Department of Historic Resources determined that the archeological consultant hired for the project was not qualified, and a new report on the site's ancient history had to be prepared.

The water authority contested those conclusions, while the attorney for the Monacan responded:6

Everyone has wondered why JRWA would have chosen to locate their project on Rassawek... now we know; they relied on advice from a consultant whom DHR has determined lacks the minimum professional requirements... Now that JRWA is obligated to hire a qualified professional, undoubtedly they will be advised that this project should never be built at Rassawek.

The lawyer representing the Monacan claimed that the James River Water Authority had chosen an unqualified contractor and deliberately damaged the historic site. If the Corps of Engineers concurred, then "anticipatory demolition" in violation of the National Historic Preservation Act would prevent issuance of a Federal permit for the pump station.7

The approval process was complicated further in October, 2019. An employee of the firm hired to prepare cultural resources management documentation for the James River Water Authority to obtain state and Federal permits became a whistleblower. He alleged the firm had altered his resume without his knowledge to make him appear to be more qualified, and:8

...sent an unqualified and untrained crew to survey and excavate at the site, lied to DHR officials, produced misleading and plagiarized reports, and did not provide appropriate resources or equipment for workers, resulting in the maltreatment of artifacts.

the James River Water Authority (JRWA) proposed to construct a pump station at the site of the Monacan capital, Rassawek
the James River Water Authority (JRWA) proposed to construct a pump station at the site of the Monacan capital, Rassawek
Source: ESRI, ArcGIS Online

In February 2020 the James River Water Authority reported on its assessment of six alternatives to the proposed site for a pump station, 12 alternative water line routes, and 5 alternative water sources. It concluded that eight feasible alternatives were cost-prohibitive. An attorney for the authority also quested if the identified site of Rassawek was accurate. He suggested it could have been at Elk Island, several miles downstream, or further up the Rivanna River.9

the James River Water Authority (JRWA) concluded in 2020 that eight feasible alternatives were cost-prohibitive
the James River Water Authority (JRWA) concluded in 2020 that eight feasible alternatives were cost-prohibitive
Source: James River Water Authority, Individual USACE Permit Supplemental Information and Alternative Analysis (February 2020)

The Monacan responded with the "Forsyth Alternative" in March, 2020 They negotiated with a nearby landowner to allow access to the river upstream of the James River Water Authority's preferred site for the pumping station. However, the James River Water Authority still decided to request approval from the US Army Corps of Engineers for its orginal preferred location. The authority estimated that building at the Forsyth site would cost an extra $10 million.10

the Monacan proposed a pipeline from the Forsyth property (blue) to intercept the line proposed by the James River Water Authority
the Monacan proposed a pipeline from the Forsyth property (blue) to intercept the line proposed by the James River Water Authority
Source: Forsyth Alternative for James River Water Authority Project

James River

The Monacan in Virginia

Rivanna River

Werowocomoco

the Forsyth Alternative proposed by the Monacan would intercept (red X) the planned pipeline just west of Columbia
the Forsyth Alternative proposed by the Monacan would intercept (red X) the planned pipeline just west of Columbia
Source: ESRI, ArcGIS Online

Links

Rassawek and the other four Monacan towns recorded by John Smith were all in the James River watershed
Rassawek and the other four Monacan towns recorded by John Smith were all in the James River watershed
Source: The Five Monacan Towns in Virginia, 1607 (by David I. Bushnell Jr., 1930)

References

1. Henry Gannett, The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, US Geological Survey, 1902, p.223, https://archive.org/details/originofcertainp00gann/page/n10 (last checked August 28, 2019)
2. "Unfortunate confluence: Ancient Monacan site intersects with Louisa's growing thirst," C'Ville, August 20, 2019, https://www.c-ville.com/unfortunate-confluence-ancient-monacan-site-intersects-with-louisas-growing-thirst/ (last checked August 28, 2019)
3. "Comments of the Monacan Indian Nation on the Revised Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) and Treatment Plan for Architectural Resources 032-0036 and 032-5124, and Archeological Sites 44FV0022, 44FV0024, and 44FV0268, associated with the James River Water Supply Pump Station and Pipeline Alignment," letter from Monacan Indian Nation attorney to Steven VanderPloeg, US Army Corps of Engineers, June 5, 2019, http://www.culturalheritagepartners.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Monacan_MOA_Comments_6_5-2019_Final_Submitted-1.pdf; "The Monacan Indian Nation Urges You To Help Save Rassawek," Cultural Heritage Partners (law firm for the Monacan Nation), http://www.culturalheritagepartners.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/SaveRassawek_8_12_2019.pdf (last checked August 16, 2019)
4. "Comments of the Monacan Indian Nation on the Revised Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) and Treatment Plan for Architectural Resources 032-0036 and 032-5124, and Archeological Sites 44FV0022, 44FV0024, and 44FV0268, associated with the James River Water Supply Pump Station and Pipeline Alignment," letter from Monacan Indian Nation attorney to Steven VanderPloeg, US Army Corps of Engineers, June 5, 2019, http://www.culturalheritagepartners.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Monacan_MOA_Comments_6_5-2019_Final_Submitted-1.pdf; "Monacan Indian Nation's Objection to the James River Water Authority's Application for the Removal and Temporary Curation of Human Remains Located at Point of Fork, Fluvanna County, Virginia, DHR File No. 2015-0984," letter from Monacan Indian Nation attorney to Julie Langan, Director Virginia Department of Historic Resources, July 23, 2019, http://www.culturalheritagepartners.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Monacan-Ltr-to-DHR_7_23_2019_final_2-1.pdf (last checked August 16, 2019)
5. "Unfortunate confluence: Ancient Monacan site intersects with Louisa's growing thirst," C'Ville, August 20, 2019, https://www.c-ville.com/unfortunate-confluence-ancient-monacan-site-intersects-with-louisas-growing-thirst/ (last checked August 28, 2019)
6. "Officials say archaeologist is unqualified for Rassawek water project," Daily Progress, September 14, 2019, https://www.dailyprogress.com/news/local/officials-say-archaeologist-is-unqualified-for-rassawek-water-project/article_d028c54d-0eff-5504-83e8-91af565043fa.html; "Obtain a Permit," US Army Corps of Engineers, https://www.usace.army.mil/Missions/Civil-Works/Regulatory-Program-and-Permits/Obtain-a-Permit/ (last checked September 16, 2019)
7. "Whistleblower claims archaeological survey of Point of Fork 'illegal, unethical, and unscientific'," Fluvanna Review, October 30, 2019, http://fluvannareview.com/2019/10/whistleblower-claims-archaeological-survey-of-point-of-fork-illegal-unethical-and-unscientific/ (last checked November 1, 2019)8. "In deep: Allegations of mismanagement complicate Louisa’s demand for water," C'ville, December 11, 2019, https://www.c-ville.com/in-deep-allegations-of-mismanagement-complicate-louisas-demand-for-water/ (last checked December 13, 2019)
9. "No alternative to James River site," The Central Virginian, February 27, 2020, https://www.thecentralvirginian.com/news/no-alternative-to-james-river-site/article_d0edd2c6-58cc-11ea-b90a-274ddd2adafc.html (last checked February 29, 2020)
10. Letter re: Alternatives Analysis for JRWA Project, Cultural Heritage Partners, March 10, 2020, http://www.culturalheritagepartners.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/CHPLettertoJRWA_ForsythAlternative_3_10_2020.pdf; "Despite opposition, JRWA still to pursue Rassawek site for water pump station," Daily Progress, March 12, 2020, https://www.dailyprogress.com/news/local/despite-opposition-jrwa-still-to-pursue-rassawek-site-for-water/article_6595e519-b6c0-5d14-a689-91453a6caf3b.html; "Monacans propose new water site," The Central Virginian, March 12, 2020, https://www.thecentralvirginian.com/news/monacans-propose-new-water-site/article_f38f61a6-63c0-11ea-b9e5-775ccaa49a0c.html (last checked March 12, 2020)

James River Water Authority needed a permit from the US Army Corps of Engineers, since the proposed pump station would impact Waters of the United States
James River Water Authority needed a permit from the US Army Corps of Engineers, since the proposed pump station would impact Waters of the United States
Source: James River Water Authority, USGS for Public Notice - NAO-2014-00708


Native American Tribes in Virginia Since Contact
"Indians" of Virginia - the Real First Families of Virginia
Virginia Places