J.E.B. Stuart on Monument Avenue in Richmond

The J.E.B. Stuart Monument is at the intersection of Monument Avenue and North Lombardy Street. The Monument Avenue Commission circulated background material on it for a public forum in August, 2017:1

Date Conceived: A resolution by city council for a statue was made immediately following Stuart’s death during the CW.

Date Erected: May 30, 1907

Location: Original desired location: Capitol Square. Final: Round-a-bout Intersection of Monument Avenue and Lombardy Street. City Board of Alderman gave $20,000 to place it “anywhere but Capitol Square.” The site was decided upon around 1904.

Sculptor: Frederick Moynihan

Organizers: In 1891 the Veteran Cavalry Association of the Army of Northern Virginia was organized. Fitzhugh Lee was a member and created the Stuart Monument Association. A sketch of the monument was provided in 1896 by M. J. Dimmock during a Confederate veterans’ reunion.

Description: 22’ bronze equestrian monument of the young General seems to be halting his horse from full stride. He is turning to face east down what would have been at the time oncoming traffic heading west on W. Franklin St. (street is now one-way heading east to facilitate better rush hour traffic). He is wearing his signature hat and is in full uniform with a sword at his side. The statue base is of Virginia granite and is in the shape of a sloping hill. The base of the statue is inscribed with:
East side: MAJ. GEN J.E.B. STUART / Commander Cavalry Corps / Army Northern Virginia / Confederate States of America / This statue erected by his comrades and the City of Richmond A.D. 1907
West side: Born in Patrick County, Va, February 6, 1833/ Died in Richmond, Va, May 12, 1864 / Aged 31 Years / Mortally wounded in the Battle of Yellow Tavern May 11, 1864 / “He gave his life for his country and saved his city from capture.”
South side: “Tell General Stuart to act on his own judgement and do what he thinks best; I have implicit confidence in him.” – General T. F. (Stonewall) Jackson on turning over the command of his troops to Stuart, after being wounded at Chancellorsville, May 2, 1863.
North side: His grateful countrymen will mourn his loss and cherish his memory. To his comrades in arms he has left the proud recollection of his deeds and the inspiring influence of his example.” General R.E. Lee announcing the death of General Stuart to his Army, May 20, 1864.

Confederate Monuments in Virginia

History-Oriented Tourism

Monument Avenue in Richmond

- Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue in Richmond
- Jefferson Davis on Monument Avenue in Richmond
- Stonewall Jackson on Monument Avenue in Richmond
- Mathew Fontaine Maury on Monument Avenue in Richmond
- Arthur Ashe on Monument Avenue in Richmond

Links

References

1. "Monument Avenue Commission - August 9, 2017," Monument Avenue Commission, August 9, 2017, https://static1.squarespace.com/static/597a220f579fb3cca0ab3454/t/59ba83c47eff41a09686fd60/1505395655892/MAC+Program+August+9.pdf (last checked April 21, 2019)


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