Nansemond County

colonists expanded from Jamestown and settled along the Nansemond River, displacing the Native Americans
colonists expanded from Jamestown and settled along the Nansemond River, displacing the Native Americans
Source: Library of Congress, The lower parish of Nansemond County, Va. with adjoining portions of Norfolk County

Nansemond apparently meant fishing point (a place of land or peninsula on which the fishing was good) to the Native Americans who lived in the region when the English arrived.

In 1637, the House of Burgesses divided New Norfolk County and created Upper Norfolk County and a separate Lower Norfolk County. The House of Burgesses renamed Upper Norfolk County as Nansemond County nine years later, in 1646.

It remained Nansemond County until 1972, when the county and the towns of Holland and Whaleyville merged to become the City of Nansemond. It merged into the City of Suffolk in 1974, reuniting the county and the county seat into one governmental unit for the first time since the City of Suffolk had become an independent political unit in 1910.1

Lower Norfolk County

Merging Local Governments

"Missing" Counties of Virginia

Nansemond County

New Norfolk County

Norfolk County

Suffolk

Upper Norfolk County

Virginia Cities That Have "Disappeared" - and Why

Virginia Towns That Have "Disappeared" - and Why

Why There Are No Towns or Counties in Southeastern Virginia

Nansemond County was created primarily to document land ownership and transfers in local court records
Nansemond County was created primarily to document land ownership and transfers in local court records
Source: Library of Congress, The lower parish of Nansemond County, Va. with adjoining portions of Norfolk County : Elizabeth City Shire 1634, New Norfolk County 1636, Upper Norfolk County 1637, Nansemond County 1642

Nansemond County in 1862
Nansemond County in 1862
Source: Library of Congress, Hare's map of the vicinity of Richmond, and Peninsular campaign in Virginia (by J. Knowles Hare, 1862)

References

1. "Virginia: Consolidated Chronology of State and County Boundaries," Atlas of Historical County Boundaries, Newberry Library, https://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/documents/VA_Consolidated_Chronology.htm#Consolidated_Chronology (last checked October 8, 2020)


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