Dogue/Moyumpse in Virginia

Tauxenent was the main town of the Moyumpse, also known as the Dogue
Tauxenent was the main town of the Moyumpse, also known as the Dogue
Source: Library of Congress, Virginia (by John Smith, 1624)

When John Smith sailed up the Potomac River in 1608, he encountered an Algonquian-speaking tribe at the mouth of the Occoquan River. Smith recorded 40 men capable of serving as warriors at their main town called Tauxenent. In contrast, he thought the Patawomeke had 160 "able men," the Moyowances had 100, and the Nacotchtanke had 80.1

The ancestors of those tribes had settled at the mouths of streams flowing into the Potomac River perhaps 500 years earlier, after adopting the pattern of growing corn for a large percentage of their diet. The original campsites of the first Native Americans in the area 15,000 years ago were underwater. They were drowned as the ice sheet melted, sea level rose, and the Chesapeake Bay formed.

After the Native Americans began relying upon corn around 900CE (Common Era), towns were created where estuaries provided food and soil was suitable for agriculture. The original settlers at the mouth of the Occoquan River may have abandoned that location, or may have been displaced, about 50 years before the English settled Jamestown. A new group may have migrated into the area between Quantico and Mason Neck in the middle of the 1500's.

homesites of the ancestors to the Dogue are probably underwater now, on the flats overlooking the ancient Potomac River channel where there was easy access to anadromous fish
homesites of the ancestors to the Dogue are probably underwater now, on the flats overlooking the ancient Potomac River channel where there was easy access to anadromous fish
Source: ESRI, ArcGIS Online

The people Smith knew as the Taux may have called themselves the Moyumpse. Their rivals to the south, such as the Patawomeke, used the pejorative term "Dogue" to refer to the Moyumpse. Since the English associated most closely with the tribes controlled by Powhatan, by 1660 "Dogue" was the standard name among the colonists.2

by 1714, after Bacon's Rebellion, Indian Land was territory controlled by the Piscataway in Maryland
by 1714, after Bacon's Rebellion, "Indian Land" was territory controlled by the Piscataway in Maryland
Source: Library of Congress, Virginia, Marylandia et Carolina: in America septentrionali Brittannorum industria excultae (by Johann Baptist Homann, 1714)

Occoquan Bay, once the home of the Dogue and now the Belmont Bay development
Occoquan Bay, once the home of the Dogue and now the Belmont Bay development
Source: Historic Prince William, Rt. 1 and Belmont Bay - #107

In 1666, the Piscataway had been weakened greatly by raids from the Iroquois. To gain protection provided by the Maryland colonists, the tayac of the Piscataway signed "Articles of Peace and Amity" in the name of 11 other tribes, including the "Doags."3

Bacon's Rebellion in 1676

Native American Tribes in Virginia Since Contact

a 1731 map showed the Doogs living near the Rappahannock River
a 1731 map showed the "Doogs" living near the Rappahannock River
Source: Library of Congress, A new and exact map of the dominions of the King of Great Britain on ye continent of North America (by Herman Moll, 1731)

Links

the Dogue were associated with the Piscataway when English colonists arrived in Virginia
the Dogue were associated with the Piscataway when English colonists arrived in Virginia
Source: Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean, Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

References

1. The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles, John Smith, 1624, p.24, https://docsouth.unc.edu/southlit/smith/smith.html (last checked August 1, 2022)
2. "Shedding Light on Early History," The Connection, January 11, 2006, http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/news/2006/jan/11/shedding-light-on-early-history/; Thomas Elliott Campbell, Colonial Caroline: a History of Caroline County, Virginia, Dietz Press, 1954, pp.42-43, https://www.google.com/books/edition/Colonial_Caroline/ToAGAQAAIAAJ?hl=en (last checked July 30, 2022)
3. Anna Coxe Toogood, "General Historic Background Study, Piscataway Park, Maryland," National Park Service, September 1969, pp.1-2, p.146, http://npshistory.com/publications/pisc/gen-hist-background.pdf (last checked September 8, 2020)


"Indians" of Virginia - the Real First Families of Virginia
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